MANAGING EXPECTATIONS

two young childrenAlthough it is only November, as soon as the clocks go back it seems that everyone is trying to get us to focus on Christmas.  Christmas can be a great family time of year, an excuse to take some time to visit friends and family, but equally it can be a dreadful time of financial and emotional stress which can, for some families be the final straw.  Or it can just be average, most peoples’ Christmases are in fact just that, ok, nothing more nothing less.  But unfortunately the weeks of hype that lead up to Christmas encourage everyone to expect that Christmas should in some way be Fantastic.  Full of smiling parents and beautiful children, the perfect Granny and other relations in attendance.  Everyone with lavish and perfectly prepared food with great presents which everyone receives with beaming smiles.  Although we all know the reality is not like, that the marketing hype inevitably gets to us.

So, how can we manage Christmas better particularly if we do not happen to belong to the perfect family?  I think that what people are really short of despite the recession meaning that people are also short of money, is time and that, instead of spending hours shopping for loads of presents or even buying our children lots of things, we should actually propose a different sort of Christmas where spending time is more important than having presents.  Most adults have far too much stuff and I think that can be said of children too, although they might not so readily admit it.

The message must be that if parents can work together in relation to the arrangements for the children whether together or separate, it is in their best interests.  Try and manage everybody’s expectations so you do not end up being disappointed about the lack of perfection which is an artificial creation anyway.  Reality might actually be better.

Some key points to focus on if parents are separated are: –

  • Agree – Which parent will have access to the children and when?
  • Allow the children to be able to fully relax and have a fun time with only one parent, without feeling  disloyal or missing the other parent.
  • Avoid any competition between the parents about the provision of presents and stuff generally.  Is the parent with a better job or a new partner able to give the children a better time? Don’t go there!
  • Think about how you deal with the fact that there may be sad memories of past Christmases when you were all together.

Of course Christmas is a difficult time of year for all families particularly post separation, perhaps the following might help: –

  1. Perfect the essential art of enjoying the now – becoming a human being rather than a human doing.  Perfection is, as we have established, impossible so just enjoy what and who you have.
  2. Count to ten or take three deep breaths and relax before responding to a wind up from your nearest and dearest in whatever form  – now including Twitter, Facebook, text.
  3. Try and let go and have fun!
  4. Try and make up your mind that you are going to have a good time this Christmas whatever the circumstances leading up to it and plan ahead.  Having a schedule in place for when the children will be with each partner if you are separated will ease their anxiety and help any transitions between parents.

For further information please contact Cotswold Family Law  at info@cotswoldfamilylaw.co.uk or call 01608 686 590 or contact via our website at www.cotswoldfamilylaw.co.uk